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The Children’s Cancer Ride is a sponsored family friendly bike ride along the River Tyne. Choose from a 9 mile or 22 mile route, both starting and finishing at the Cycle Hub on Newcastle Quayside.

Our ride isn’t a race, it’s just a great chance to get out on your bikes and take on an enjoyable challenge. Whether you choose the 9 or the 22 mile route, you will follow dedicated cycle paths along the River Tyne. The 9 mile route takes you to Scotswood Bridge and the 22 mile route to Wylam, before turning back to finish at the Cycle Hub. The routes will be well signposted and we will have marshals along the way to provide encouragement or assistance if needed. All of our riders will receive:

  • A medal to mark their achievement
  • A limited edition cycling accessory
  • An NECCR headwear morf
  • Refreshments along the 22 mile route and on finishing the ride

There is no minimum sponsorship for taking part but we do ask you to raise what you can. The entry fees simply cover the cost of the event, it is the sponsorship you raise that will make a difference to children diagnosed with cancer. Everything you raise will help fund research to find more effective and less toxic treatments for childhood cancer.

Don’t have a bike? Don’t worry, the Cycle Hub are offering bike hire for just £10 for anyone taking part in the Children’s Cancer Ride. If you have a bike, but it hasn’t seen the road for a while, bring it along for a FREE bike check before the start of the ride and one of our mechanics will check it over for you.

If you would be interested in bike hire please email us on contactus@neccr.org.uk and we will issue with a discount code to use when booking your event day bikes through the Cycle Hub.

Sign up today!

It only takes a few minutes to enter through our on-line system. If you need any help with registering please contact us on contactus@neccr.org.uk.

Download your paper sponsor form today!

Why support NECCR?

Your support helps to make a real difference in the fight against childhood cancer. Research into childhood cancer currently receives only 3% of the overall spend on cancer research yet it remains the biggest cause of non-accidental death among children in the UK. We need to find more effective and less toxic treatments to help save more lives and help children who survive cancer have long and healthy lives.

Watch Julie’s story to find out more about the impact of childhood cancer on one family living in the North:

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